What is Rainscaping?

Rainscaping is any combination of plantings, water features, catch basins, permeable pavement, and other activities that manage stormwater as close as possible to where it falls, rather than moving it someplace else. In addition to rain gardens and bioswales, a diverse landscape that includes trees, shrubs, perennials, mulch, and amended soils intercepts and disperses rain as it falls, and allows more water absorption into the soil and by plants.

Rainscaping graphic

Why Rainscape?

Impervious surfaces such as rooftops and driveways have replaced healthy soils and natural plant communities that once readily absorbed rainwater. The resulting runoff contributes to water pollution, health challenges, and property damage. You can landscape your yard for both beauty and function. Address specific water issues on your own property such as erosion, wet areas of the yard and difficult-to-mow places, while positively impacting your neighbors and area streams as well.

For more information about how to incorporate rainscaping in your yard, visit the Missouri Botanical Garden's online Rainscaping Guide.

The Missouri Botanical Garden Rainscaping Guide is partially funded by the Mabel Dorn Reeder Foundation and US EPA Region 7 through the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (subgrant number G11-NPS-15), under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.